Friday, October 15, 2010

Apple iPad VS Samsung Galaxy Tab VS Dell Streak... A Tablets Post

At the very moment, there are three top of the line Tablets available in the market

Apple iPad
Samsung Galaxy Tab
And Dell Streak

iPad Specs


  • 9.7-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit glossy widescreen Multi-Touch display with IPS technology
  • 1024-by-768-pixel resolution at 132 pixels per inch (ppi)
  • Fingerprint-resistant oleophobic coating
  • Support for display of multiple languages and characters simultaneously


  • 16GB, 32GB, or 64GB flash drive


  • 1GHz Apple A4 custom-designed, high-performance, low-power system-on-a-chip

Battery and power4

  • Built-in 25-watt-hour rechargeable lithium-polymer battery
  • Up to 10 hours of surfing the web on Wi-Fi, watching video, or listening to music
  • Up to 9 hours of surfing the web using 3G data network
  • Charging via power adapter or USB to computer system

Wireless and cellular

Wi-Fi model
  • Wi-Fi (802.11a/b/g/n)
  • Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR technology
Wi-Fi + 3G model
  • UMTS/HSDPA (850, 1900, 2100 MHz)
  • GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz)
  • Data only2
  • Wi-Fi (802.11a/b/g/n)
  • Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR technology
 Dell Streak Specs
  • Carrier: AT&T
  • OS: Android 1.6
  • Processor: 1 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon (QSD 8250)
  • RAM: 512 MB
  • Storage: 2 GB built-in, plus 16 GB micro-SD (expandable to 32 GB)
  • Display: 5-inch WVGA, 800×480 pixels, Gorilla Glass
  • Battery: Lithium Ion 1530 mAh
  • Ports: 30-pin to USB
  • Weight: 7.7 oz
  • Dimensions: 6.0(h) x 3.1(w) x 0.4(d) inches
  • Camera: 5.0 megapixel (rear) with autofocus; VGA front-facing
  • Sensors: Accelerometer, GPS, e-compass
  • Keyboard: 49-key virtual keyboard (including number pad)
  • Networks: UMTS 850/1900/2100 MHz; GSM/EDGE 850/900/1800/1900 MHz;
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g; Bluetooth 2.1 EDR
  • Tethering: Not available
  • Price: $300 (with 2-year contract); $550 without a contract
Samsung Galaxy Tab Specs

  • 7-inch TFT touchscreen display (1024 by 600 pixels resolution)
  • Weight of 13 ounces, or “about the weight of an unopened can of soda.”
  • Thanks to its lithe figure, it fits into the back pocket of your jeans, or the inside pocket of a blazer.
  • It runs on the Google Android 2.2 (Froyo) operating system.
  • Thanks to Android 2.2, it supports Adobe Flash 10.1
  • It has two cameras: a 3-megapixel one on the back (with flash, DVD-quality video) and a 1.3-megapixel one on the front for videoconferencing and chat functionality.
  • It uses a 1GHz Hummingbird processor
  • It has 16 gigabytes of on-board memory. It’s also expandable
  • It supports DLNA sharing and streaming among supported devices (TVs, laptops)
  • It carries a battery that’s rated for 7 hours of video playback.
  • A Wi-Fi-only model is coming “in the near future.”
  • Optional accessories include an external keyboard, docking station with HDMI port and a car dock.
  • Audio and video content comes via Samsung’s new Media Hub.
  • It’s available on all four U.S. carriers: Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile.
And Here's a comparison between Galaxy Tab and iPad

Samsung stressed the ease in which applications could be formatted for the Tab without lots of additional coding, but the size suggests that the device may be more appropriate for the things users do with smartphones and the iPod touch — web browsing, game-playing, news reading via apps — versus the things the iPad hints at doing in the future, such as reading full-bleed magazines, interacting with textbooks and creating content.

All in all, versatility is one of the things that makes the iPad great. You can use it to read big PDFs, look at business reports and dashboards, view video clips, quickly scan through emails and calendars, and pull up full Web pages - all in the palm of your hand. The problem is that the iPad is not necessarily fantastic at any one function. As a result, the iPad and other touch tablets like it will need to make the ROI case to businesses and IT departments based on ease-of-use, which could possibly save on training and troubleshooting, for example.

 The Dell Streak has two things going for it: 1.) It’s technically the first Android tablet from one of the big PC vendors so it has first-mover advantage, and 2.) When you get it your hands, it feels very usable and likeable. But, the Dell Streak is much more like a smartphone than a tablet and when you compare it to the other top-of-the-line smartphones, it becomes much less attractive. If you really want an Android device with a big screen that feels like a small tablet, I’d recommend the 4.3-inch HTC EVO 4G over the Dell Streak.


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